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Lung Cancer NGS Panels


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Lung cancers are divided in two major types the small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and the non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).

The majority of lung cancer cases occur after long term exposure to tobacco smoke. The occurrence of cancer in people who never smoked is often caused by a combination of genetic factors (Alberg and Samet 2003, Alberg et al. 2013) and the exposure to certain environmental factors. 

Based on the Swedish Family-Cancer database the heritability of lung cancer was estimated at 8% (Czene et al. 2002).

Different candidate genes for lung cancer susceptibility are described including the chromosomal region and genes: CHRNA3, CHRNA5, TERT, CLPTM1L, BAT3, MSH5, ROS1, VTI1A, NRXN1, and TP63 (Yang et al. 2013).

This page list different NGS panel that target genes wherein mutations are related to higher risk of developing lung cancer.

For more information about the targeted genes please contact the NGS panel provider. General information about lung cancer types are available on this website.


Lung Cancer

Human Lung Cancer Panel

The Human Lung Cancer GeneRead DNAseq Targeted Panel is a collection of multiplexed PCR primer assays for targeted enrichment of the coding (exonic) regions of the 4 genes most commonly mutated in human lung cancer samples. Mutations in these oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are often relevant for tumor classification, and warrant extensive investigation to enhance the understanding of carcinogenesis. The 2 major forms of lung cancer are small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).
Source: Qiagen

Lung Cancer Comprehensive Mutation and Translocation Panel

Lung Cancer Comprehensive Mutation and Translocation Panel by Next Generation Sequencing
Most comprehensive screening panel for determining eligibility for TKI therapy. Detects mutations in ALK, AKT1, BRAF, EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB4, KRAS, NRAS, and PIK3CA genes, and ALK, ROS, and RET translocations.
Source: Arup Laboratories


Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

GeneTrails® NSCLC Panel

Screening for mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is increasingly important in delivering personalized cancer care. The GeneTrails® NSCLC Panel delivers information on a variety of treatment-informative mutations in the 23 genes listed below, which are known to play a role in cases of non-small cell lung cancer. The next-gen sequencing panel has a sensitivity of ≤10% mutant allele.
Source: Knight Diagnostic Laboratories
Targeted genes: AKT1 DDR2 JAK2 NOTCH1 NTRK3 PTEN ALK* EGFR KDR NRAS PIK3CA PTPRD BRAF ERBB2 KRAS NTRK1 PIK3R1 TP53 CDKN2A HRAS MAP2K1 NTRK2 PIK3R2

NSCLC NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING PANEL

Website

Sentosa SQ NSCLC Panel

The Sentosa SQ NSCLC Panel is a Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)-based in vitrodiagnostic test that simultaneously detects hot spot mutations in 11 genes from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples that have previously demonstrated clinical relevance in the management of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Source: Vela Diagnostics

Website


Alberg AJ, Samet JM (2003) Epidemiology of lung cancer |PubMed|

Alberg AJ, Brock MV, Ford JG, Samet JM, Spivack SD (2013) Epidemiology of lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines |PubMed|

Czene K, Lichtenstein P, Hemminki K (2002) Environmental and heritable causes of cancer among 9.6 million individuals in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database |PubMed|

Ian A. Yang, John W. Holloway, Kwun M. Fong (2013) Genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and co-morbidities |PubMed|


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