This website uses cookies in order to improve our services. If you proceed visiting this website you accept the usage of cookies. For more info please read our Data Privacy statement.

 

Gastric Cancer NGS Panels


General Cancer Testing | Brain & CNS Cancer | Breast & Ovarian Cancer | Colorectal & Prostate Cancer | Endocrine & Thyroid Cancer | Gastric Cancer | Hematologic Cancer | Kidney Cancer | Lung Cancer | Pancreatic Cancer | Skin Cancer & Melanoma | Solid Tumors | Less Common Cancers


Gastric cancer also known as stomach cancer. The major cause is the infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori

Gastric cancer remains highly prevalent and accounts for a notable proportion of global cancer mortality. This cancer is also associated with poor survival rates. Understanding the genetic basis of gastric cancer will offer insights into its pathogenesis, help identify new biomarkers and novel treatment targets, aid prognostication and could be central to developing individualized treatment strategies in the future. An inherited component contributes to <3% of gastric cancers; the majority of genetic changes associated with gastric cancer are acquired (McLean and El-Omar 2014). 

Mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA are related to higher risk of gastric cancer development. 

On this page NGS panels are introduced that target different genes wherein mutations can be related to elevated risk for the development of gastric cancer. 

For more information on the targeted genes please contact the NGS panel provider, general information on gastric cancer are found on this website.


 

Gastric Cancer, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) and Polyposis

FAMILIAL GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GISTS) VIA THE PDGFRA GENE

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal tumors found in the gastrointestinal tract. In most cases, GISTs spontaneously arise due to somatic mutations in the KIT gene, and less frequently in the PDGFRA gene.Individuals with PDGFRA mutations show clinical manifestations similar to patients with KIT germline mutations, including dysphagia, hyperpigmentation and urticaria pigmentosa; however patients with germline PDGFRA mutations have distinct clinical features, such as large hands, lipomas, intestinal neurofibromatosis, and small intestine fibrous tumors.
Source: Prevention Genetics

Gastric Cancer

Multi Gene Panel (10 Genes)
Targeted genes: BMPR1A CDH1 CHEK2 MLH1 MSH2 MSH6 PMS1 PMS2 STK11 TP53
Source: Medical Genetics Center

Gastric cancer panel, targeted

Tested genes BMPR1A, CDH1, EPCAM, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS1, PMS2, SMAD4

Source: Centogene

Gastrointestinal Hereditary Cancer Panel

Confirm a diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal (GI) cancer in individuals with a personal or family history of GI cancer and/or polyposis.
Sequencing and Deletion/Duplication, 15 Genes

Source: ARUP Laboratories

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

Multi Gene Panel (11 Genes)
Targeted genes: KIT MAX MEN1 NF1 PRKAR1A SDHAF2 SDHB SDHC SDHD SMARCB1 TMEM127
Source: Medical Genetics Center

GIST MASTR assay

The GIST MASTR assay amplifies exons 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 of the KIT gene and exons 8, 10, 12, 14, 18 of the PDGFRA gene. The assay contains 17 amplicons (120-220 bp), which are amplified in 2 multiplex PCR reactions.
Source: multiplicom

Website

Hereditary Gastric Cancer Panel

Our Hereditary Gastric Cancer Panel includes sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of the following 20 genes: CDH1, MSH2, STK11, CTNNA1, MSH6, PTEN, KIT, PMS2, SDHB, PDGFRA, EPCAM, SDHC, BRCA1, APC, TP53, BRCA2, SMAD4, MAP3K6, MLH1, BMPR1A.

Source: University of Chicaco Genetic Services

Human Gastric Cancer Panel

The Human Gastric Cancer GeneRead DNAseq Targeted Panel is a collection of multiplexed PCR primer assays for targeted enrichment of the coding (exonic) regions of the 29 genes most commonly mutated in human gastric cancer samples. Mutations in these oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are often relevant for tumor classification, and warrant extensive investigation to enhance the understanding of carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer, or stomach cancer, originates in any part of the stomach, but can spread to other organs such as the esophagus, liver, lungs, and lymph nodes. Gastric cancer is not as well-defined molecularly as other cancer types, and the key driver mutations have not yet been identified. However, many genes commonly mutated in gastric cancer have been identified, such as PIK3CA. Therefore, a panel of genes commonly mutated in gastric cancer is an efficient way to research a tumor sample’s potential carcinogenic mechanisms.
Source: Qiagen

Invitae Familial Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Syndrome Panel

This test analyzes genes associated with familial gastrointestinal stromal tumor syndrome (GIST), which is a rare hereditary gastrointestinal cancer predisposition syndrome.
The genes in the Invitae Familial Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Syndrome Panel are associated with familial GIST, but the overall percentage of hereditary GIST cases attributed to these genes is currently unclear. Inclusion of several GIST-related genes is expected to increase the clinical sensitivity of this test.
Source: Invitae

Invitae Gastric Cancer Panel

The Invitae Gastric Cancer Panel analyzes genes that are associated with an increased lifetime risk of developing stomach cancer. These genes were selected based on the available evidence to date to provide Invitae’s broadest hereditary gastric cancer test. Many of these genes are also associated with an increased risk of other cancer types.
The primary panel includes 18 genes that are associated with with hereditary gastric cancer. In addition to the primary panel, clinicians can also choose to include a gene, CTNNA1, that has limited evidence of association with gastric cancer.
Source: Invitae

PGL / PCC / GIST panel, targeted

Tested genes GDNF, KIF1B, MAX, MEN1, NF1, RET, SDHA, SDHAF2, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, TMEM127, TP53, VHL

Source: Centogene

PGL/PCC (Paraganglioma/Pheochromocytoma) Panel

The family history is suggestive of a predisposition to PGL/PCC. Although SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD are the genes that are the most often associated with classic forms of hereditary paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma syndrome, there are several other genes that cause an increased risk of these tumors.
Tested genes: FH, MAX, MEN1, NF1, RET, SDHA, SDHAF2, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, TMEM127, VHL

Source: GeneDx

PIEBALDISM AND FAMILIAL GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GISTS) VIA THE KIT GENE

Mutations in the c-kit proto-oncogene (KIT) cause a variety of disorders, including piebaldism, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), germ cell tumors (GCTs) and hematopoietic neoplasms such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and malignant lymphoma (reviewed in Akin and Metcalfe, J Allergy Clin Immunol 114:13-19, 2004).
Source: Prevention Genetics

Polyposis Syndromes

Numerous polyposis syndromes may present with gastrointestinal (GI) polyps. Hereditary types include familial adenomatous polyposis and hamartomatous polyposis, and other rare polyposis syndromes. Molecular genetic testing enables differential diagnosis of GI polyposis syndromes often defined with overlapping and indistinguishable phenotypes.
Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis, BMPR1A-related juvenile polyposis, SMAD4-related juvenile polyposis, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome are included in the testing.
Source: Asper Biotech


McLean MH, El-Omar EM (2014) Genetics of gastric cancer |PubMed|


Pin It